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Thomas More

Phil,

You mention "born leaders" in the church, and then list some titles. That isn't always the case. Titles don't always flow to leaders, and leaders don't always have titles. Ideally, if they are good leaders, the church recognizes them and puts them in the right jobs. Sometimes our title-hungry society seems to look beyond someone's leadership abilities and just see their title. And vice versa.

Also, your line: "We seem to categorise some people as “leaders”, even “born leaders” based largely on their personality but also on communication skills and confidence" isn't quite what I would say.

I agree with those attributes, but I think the missing one is "vision." A leader needs 1) to have some place to go and 2) the ability to take others there. Your list speaks to 2, but not to 1. But I think 1 is more important. Remember the millstone warning to 'leading' others to the wrong place.

The vision/direction component is also the more interesting of the two. It goes to helping others--in your examples, either how to run a scientific experiment or how to get to heaven. In either case, your followers will be in a better place after having walked with you for a few miles. The other leadership traits you list, however, are often largely innate. Yes, they can be worked on and increased, but some of it is "born", as you say.

I don't think, however, that lets those who see themselves as not 'born' leaders off the hook. That is particularly true if they know the direction we ought to be going (have received the gospel in your example.) At that point, like the lepers in 2 Kings 7, they need to share with others. The lepers weren't in a physical (health) or social (outcasts) position to be seen widely as leaders, yet they knew good news and had to share it. And by doing so, they saved (led) others from starvation.

For others, it might simply be being saved from broken beakers and test tubes. Either way, if we'd want to know how to do something, as a good neighbor, we ought to share (lead) that news with our neighbors if we know it.

John

Philomena, you are a very bad girl, putting your boss in such a tight spot.

And I wouldn't sell yourself short in the leadership category.

John

Philomena, you are a very bad girl, putting your boss in such a tight spot.

And I wouldn't sell yourself short in the leadership category.

Philomena

Thomas and John,
Thanks for the comments. John, rule number 1, never sympathise with my boss. He brings it on himself.
Thomas, thanks for adding the crutial aspect of "vision" to the discussion. That really clarifies things for me and I wonder if it separates "leading" (forward) to "managing" (sustaining)?

beth

I'd say, 'Good job,' to Philomena for raising the bar in conversation and redirecting gossip. Talk about 'bold and courageous' - and humble, too.

God gives different spiritual gifts - not all are evangelists. As someone who loved evangelism I almost didn't date or marry my discipler gifted husband beause he didn't have the gift I valued. But then I didn't have friends from decades back seeking my wise counsel either, like he did.

Yes, one needs to work on ones weaknesses. Confession and spiritual guidance are crucial in order to see ourselves as we really are and to put off the old man and put on the new man. As well, God has created you as a unique creature, with gifts to serve and extend His kingdom. It may be hospitality, music, beautifying His holy house. In seeking to grow, one need not only work on ones weaknesses, but identify and blossom in ones strengths.

For example, if you love to cook, then meet your neighbors and bring dinner to an elderly person, a single parent, a family with a new baby a seemingly perfect in tact family - maybe even a different home every week.

Enjoy!

Beth
allthesebeth@yahoo.com

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